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REPEL ULTRA PUMP SPRAY 125ml

$30.50 NZD
SKU 2236648
Qty:
  • 40pc DEET Tropical Strength .
  • not greasy and won't dry the skin .
  • silicone base Helps minimise DEET absorption into the skin and maximises the effective duration .
  • Sweat and water resistant.
People who purchased this also purchased these:

Repel Ultra Tropical Strength Insect Repellent Pump Spray 125ml

40pc DEET Insect Repellent for tropical locations, or areas with dense insect population.
  • 40pc DEET
  • alcohol-free
  • not greasy and won't dry the skin.
  • It includes antiseptics which provide a beneficial barrier on the skin, Helpful when travelling in rough environments.
  • The silicone base Helps minimise DEET absorption into the skin and maximises the effective duration also making it sweat and water resistant.
"How do I use it?"
Apply as required. - Never apply insect repellents to broken or irritated skin.

Why is there a need for insect repellents?

Exploring the outdoor is a great opportunity for our children to learn and enjoy. However, whenever they are outdoors, they are exposed to elements, including insect bites. Some insects can be harmless, producing only a very mild reaction towards the bitten child, but there are certain insects; such as: mosquitoes, biting flies and ticks, whose bites can in some cases make us sick when we are bitten.

In certain parts of Asia, Africa, Central or South America, a mosquito bite can easily translate to life threatening illnesses such as malaria and dengue fever. In fact, for New Zealand locals, there is no need to look far. In the Pacific Islands alone, there have been cases of dengue fever recorded among Kiwi travellers. There were even outbreaks of dengue fever reported in North Queensland, specifically in Cairns, Port Douglas and Townsville.

What are insect repellents?
These are preparations that have become widely popular in providing protection for the body against many forms of insect bite reactions, whether local or systemic. The use of insect repellents can be very Helpful in preventing a simple skin irritation that can lead to secondary skin infection as well as life threatening diseases caused by a measly insect bite.

There are two major categories of insect repellents:
1. Chemical repellents, which are widely accepted to be the more effective in providing long lasting protection. However, there are certain groups that are not very happy with its side effects, which they claim to be quite harmful to the general health condition of the user, especially of children.
2. Natural plant-derived repellents. These are products prepared using only natural plant based ingredients that have well-known properties to repel insects. However, some studies have shown that although these are considered to be non-harmful to the user it also provides less protection because its effects may only last for a limited time. Some plant extracts that are popular in this category are lemon and eucalyptus, citronella, lemon grass and lavender.

What are the active ingredients that fall under the category of chemical repellents?
1. DEET or N,N-diethyl-m-toluamide is considered to be the most commonly used and has a long history of safe use. However, some cases of misuse has led to cases of skin irritation, especially among very young children. DEET efficacy can be determined through  its concentration. According to CDC, DEET containing repellents with 30 to 50pc of DEET are safe to use on chidlren older than 2 months old. Higher concentrations only provide longer hours of protection but not added protection.

2. Picardin is the active ingredient that is most commonly present in insect repellents found in Europe and Australia. It comes in concentrations of 7 - 20 percent. It does not have odour and does not leave a sticky feeling. It also appears to have less potential toxocity. And it may have the same levels of efficacy as DEET but there are no studies to back-up this observation.

How does an insect repellent work?
Understanding how insect repellent works greatly depends on proper understanding of how a biting insect find their hosts. Studies on mosquito's behaviour have indicated that this particular insect use a combination of sight, heat and smell as their way of locating their prey. They are attracted to the scents of carbon dioxide, lactic acid and other odours emitted by the skin. They also like warm and moist skin. What an insect repellent does, both chemical and non-chemical based, is to create a vapour barrier that prevents the insect from getting in contact with the skin. This the reason why most insect repellents have a very strong odour because insects find these vapour to be offensive both to their sense of smell and taste.

Save on petrol - buy Insect repellents online at a great price and have it shipped to your door fast!

Repel Ultra Tropical Strength Insect Repellent Pump Spray 125ml

40pc DEET Insect Repellent for tropical locations, or areas with dense insect population.
  • 40pc DEET
  • alcohol-free
  • not greasy and won't dry the skin.
  • It includes antiseptics which provide a beneficial barrier on the skin, Helpful when travelling in rough environments.
  • The silicone base Helps minimise DEET absorption into the skin and maximises the effective duration also making it sweat and water resistant.
"How do I use it?"
Apply as required. - Never apply insect repellents to broken or irritated skin.

Why is there a need for insect repellents?

Exploring the outdoor is a great opportunity for our children to learn and enjoy. However, whenever they are outdoors, they are exposed to elements, including insect bites. Some insects can be harmless, producing only a very mild reaction towards the bitten child, but there are certain insects; such as: mosquitoes, biting flies and ticks, whose bites can in some cases make us sick when we are bitten.

In certain parts of Asia, Africa, Central or South America, a mosquito bite can easily translate to life threatening illnesses such as malaria and dengue fever. In fact, for New Zealand locals, there is no need to look far. In the Pacific Islands alone, there have been cases of dengue fever recorded among Kiwi travellers. There were even outbreaks of dengue fever reported in North Queensland, specifically in Cairns, Port Douglas and Townsville.

What are insect repellents?
These are preparations that have become widely popular in providing protection for the body against many forms of insect bite reactions, whether local or systemic. The use of insect repellents can be very Helpful in preventing a simple skin irritation that can lead to secondary skin infection as well as life threatening diseases caused by a measly insect bite.

There are two major categories of insect repellents:
1. Chemical repellents, which are widely accepted to be the more effective in providing long lasting protection. However, there are certain groups that are not very happy with its side effects, which they claim to be quite harmful to the general health condition of the user, especially of children.
2. Natural plant-derived repellents. These are products prepared using only natural plant based ingredients that have well-known properties to repel insects. However, some studies have shown that although these are considered to be non-harmful to the user it also provides less protection because its effects may only last for a limited time. Some plant extracts that are popular in this category are lemon and eucalyptus, citronella, lemon grass and lavender.

What are the active ingredients that fall under the category of chemical repellents?
1. DEET or N,N-diethyl-m-toluamide is considered to be the most commonly used and has a long history of safe use. However, some cases of misuse has led to cases of skin irritation, especially among very young children. DEET efficacy can be determined through  its concentration. According to CDC, DEET containing repellents with 30 to 50pc of DEET are safe to use on chidlren older than 2 months old. Higher concentrations only provide longer hours of protection but not added protection.

2. Picardin is the active ingredient that is most commonly present in insect repellents found in Europe and Australia. It comes in concentrations of 7 - 20 percent. It does not have odour and does not leave a sticky feeling. It also appears to have less potential toxocity. And it may have the same levels of efficacy as DEET but there are no studies to back-up this observation.

How does an insect repellent work?
Understanding how insect repellent works greatly depends on proper understanding of how a biting insect find their hosts. Studies on mosquito's behaviour have indicated that this particular insect use a combination of sight, heat and smell as their way of locating their prey. They are attracted to the scents of carbon dioxide, lactic acid and other odours emitted by the skin. They also like warm and moist skin. What an insect repellent does, both chemical and non-chemical based, is to create a vapour barrier that prevents the insect from getting in contact with the skin. This the reason why most insect repellents have a very strong odour because insects find these vapour to be offensive both to their sense of smell and taste.

Save on petrol - buy Insect repellents online at a great price and have it shipped to your door fast!


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Just a friendly reminder: Any information presented on this site is of a general nature. It is not intended to be a substitute for professional health care specific to your circumstances.It is not intended to diagnose, treat, cure or prevent any disease. Always consult your doctor or a qualified health care professional if you have questions regarding a condition. Use as directed. If symptoms persist contact your health care professional. Customer reviews reflected on the site reflect the individual experiences and may not be typical. Individual results may vary.  Copyright© Pharmacy-NZ.com 2019 All rights reserved 
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